Funding Clinical Trials

Dr. Jonathan Simons is the driving force behind the Prostate Cancer Foundation, one of the leading funders of prostate cancer research worldwide.

Prostatepedia spoke with him about what clinical trial participation can do for your own prostate cancer journey.

Join Prostatepedia to read more about prostate cancer clinical trials.

How did you become involved with prostate cancer advocacy and the Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF)?

Dr. Jonathan Simons: When I joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in 1993 as a young assistant professor, perhaps six laboratories in the world had prostate oncologists trained in molecular biology. Johns Hopkins did not have even one clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer using a medicine actually designed to fight the disease.

Then I met Mike Milken. He’d been diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer and was seeking third and fourth opinions—not only about his own case, but the state of prostate cancer research in general. Mike wasn’t new to medical philanthropy; he’d been funding a broad range of research for decades before his diagnosis. But he was new to prostate cancer, so it was encouraging when he left our meeting saying there would be an infusion of research funds and a foundation to make progress against this disease. My mentor and research director at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Donald Coffey, told me, “If anyone’s going to change this field, he’s the guy. I didn’t realize that later I’d end up being PCF’s CEO and President.

You were quite young.

Dr. Simons: I was an Assistant Professor eight months on the Johns Hopkins faculty, and I had a six-year-old and a four-year-old son running around in my office with coloring books on weekends while we set up experiments in my small laboratory. Back then, I was funded by PCF from across the hallway. They were within shouting distance. I have now a 30-year-old and a 28-year-old who do not use crayons.

What year did you officially join PCF?

Dr. Simons: I was there at the beginning in 1993 and was invited to the inaugural celebration of the founding in Washington, DC. Early funding from PCF allowed me as a physician-scientist to train in my laboratory another generation of young investigators who have gone on to become chairpersons and full professors at leading cancer institutions. Today they work toward better precision treatments and cures for prostate cancer in fields ranging from molecular biology to drug development, early clinical trials and nanotechnology. In 2007, I was recruited from the Emory University Cancer Center as its Founding Director and appointed CEO and President of the Foundation. I feel an awesome responsibility and the privilege to continue to serve the field in this way.

PCF funds quite a bit of research, both in United States and abroad. Is there a theme behind the kind of research you fund? What is your overall strategy?

Dr. Simons: The overall strategy is to fund the world’s best, most innovative ideas early enough to reduce deaths from prostate cancer, reduce suffering from prostate cancer, and ultimately eliminate prostate cancer as a plague on humanity. What that means, though, is that we fund mostly laboratory-to-clinic, game-changing, early-stage research in university and cancer center laboratories. We find partners to leverage this funding with additional government or biopharma support. We also fund research to help guide those therapies into the clinic to test whether they are successful or not.

If the treatment shows promise, we try to leverage further the tens of millions of philanthropic dollars that we put in at the beginning with hundreds of millions more from Department of Defense, National Cancer Institute, Stand Up 2 Cancer, the V Foundation, and private foundations. About 80% of what we fund is precision treatment science, 10% basic biology, and perhaps 10% prostate cancer prevention including precision nutrition research.

Additionally, PCF was established with more in mind than accelerating cure for prostate cancer. From the beginning, we aspired to change the face of cancer research and to produce results that could help people suffering from a broad range of serious diseases. We never saw the process as a zero-sum game where increased funding for one disease diminished support for others. Rather, it has always been one of our key goals to increase the size of the research pie in ways that would benefit the greatest number of people.

Your organization funds the beginning idea—sparking research—and then other organizations like pharmaceutical companies or research institutes take the ball and run with it?

Dr. Simons: That’s exactly so. Spark, instigate, cultivate scientific proof-of-concept, and convene stakeholders to ensure there is a strong ecosystem to take those concepts forward for patients.

You partner with pharmaceutical companies. You partner with medical institutions and the United States government. What about other countries? Do you work with groups in other countries?

Dr. Simons: We fund research in 21 countries. We have working partnerships with five foundations. We usually lead invest, but we are delighted to co-invest in research, particularly new kinds of treatment. We should really be called the Global Prostate Cancer Foundation.

It has been difficult for researchers to get patients to enroll in clinical trials. Why do you think that is? What has been the obstacle to getting men to participate?

Dr. Simons: It is complex. I wish I knew all the answers. I think one reason is that patients feel fear about receiving a placebo and about being a guinea pig. That almost never happens in the kind of treatment research that we fund.

But I also think there is a lack of access to information about trial availability. I still think patients aren’t empowered to ask which clinical trials could help them have a better outcome and also help others. I don’t think the system is proactive. (Crate and Barrel bothers me a lot more about their products than the National Cancer Institute bothers patients about whether or not they might be eligible for a precision medicine trial.)

We’re trying to increase awareness of these newer precision medicine clinical trials that have a much higher probability that the drug will work because the target gene is expressed or mutated. Basically: your tumor is vulnerable now and we’re getting access to it, so the investigational drugs have a real chance of getting you back into remission. I think those are the major challenges.

Another issue is distance and travel time and associated costs. Clinical trial participation goes way down if it takes the patient more significant time to get to the hospital. If you are enrolled in a clinical trial, you have to go back and forth more often to see the doctor and nurses monitoring you. With a longer commute, participation rates fall. We’re therefore very interested in telemedicine, or using the internet, so patients don’t have to drive as much. That’s still experimental. Dr. Matthew Galsky, from Mount Sinai, is working on that problem.

Using telemedicine in clinical trials?

Dr. Simons: Yes. Most everything in the clinical trials world is still analog, and yet we live in this extraordinarily digital age. I’m talking to you on my phone—a piece of glass with some metal off ultra high frequency radio waves. Right before this call I was looking at an MRI scan on my iPhone. I can do that, but we still make patients drive 90 minutes to see a doctor when we could probably use a smartphone.

There are a lot of ways we could very reliably take care of patients in an outpatient fashion. We just haven’t fully digitized clinical trials, particularly for patients at a distance. There are a lot of ways to innovate around digital healthcare that would help make clinical trials easier for prostate cancer patients.

I think some men assume that a clinical trial might not be an option until their cancer has advanced. They wait until things have gotten really bad and then they look for a trial. I don’t get the impression that many people think about trials when they’re first diagnosed.

Dr. Simons: No.

But there are trials for the newly diagnosed, aren’t there?

Dr. Simons: Absolutely. And a lot of them offer the possibility of much greater longevity and survival. Your instinct should be: where is the right clinical trial? But you’re still processing, thinking, “My God, I have cancer!” We could do a much better job of educating patients.

How do most people find out about clinical trials? Just waiting for your doctor to say that she has found a trial you might want to consider? Or is the burden on the patient to find the trial?

Dr. Simons: Most of the time, if your physician isn’t a real champion, it’s just not a part of the consultation. Most clinical trial enrollment happens because you have a urological oncologist who believes in putting patients on clinical trials and is probably participating in one. We’d like patients at every stage in their journey to look for a clinical trial with the idea that it might offer a better plan of care than they would otherwise have. We could also do a better job of encouraging nurses to talk with patients about clinical trials.

How would you suggest men look for trials?

Dr. Simons: The site http://www.clinicaltrials.gov is an excellent place to look. I think www.PCF.org is an excellent place to look as well. Making a habit of asking your doctor if there are any new clinical trials for where you are is also a great idea. Create the expectation that your doctor has to pay attention to potential trials.

The site http://www.clinicaltrials.gov tends to be a little bit technical. I would think it might be difficult for the average person to sort through.

Dr. Simons: You can always just ask your nurse or doctor about it. But I agree. We put more than 82 cents on the dollar into our research mission every year. But we wish we had the resources to create an incredibly patient-friendly, readable, real-time, digital website for clinical trials. Until somebody does that, clinicaltrials.gov and pcf.org are good places to find the really important trials.

I suppose you could always come up with a list of trials and then bring it to you doctor and ask if any are appropriate for you.

Dr. Simons: Yes. For right now, that is the best thing to do. The first thousand men cured of advanced metastatic prostate cancer will all be on a clinical trial. That’s a true thing. This is how we talk to lymphoma patients. It’s just more and more possible to talk about it for prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is undergoing a revolution that other cancers have already gone through?

Dr. Simons: We’ve cut the death rate down by 52%. That’s incredible. For the last 48%, we’re going to need clinical trials. We need patients on clinical trials to take the death rate to zero. Sometimes prostate cancer, unfortunately, escapes surgery or radiation and comes back. While we’ve significantly increased the overall survival rate, we’re not yet able to cure the majority of men. We think we can. We know we can, but we have more work to do.

What does the financial end of clinical trial participation look like? Do men have to pay a fee for the therapies?

Dr. Simons: In clinical trials, research drugs are always free. Medical care is always free. The inconvenience is what is costly. Some employers are very difficult about you missing work for a clinical trial. There is a lot of going back and forth. They call it wage and financial toxicity. One of the effects of the experimental drug is toxic to job security. (It’s hard enough when you’re a cancer patient and worried about your employer.) But the drugs, the pharmacy, the medical care, and the scans are all free.

Is there anything else you think patients might want to know about clinical trials?

Dr. Simons: The misperception is that patients will be treated like guinea pigs. But the first thousand patients cured of prostate cancer will all be on a clinical trial. Every major clinical trial is changing prostate cancer patient survival.

For example, in the SPARTAN trial for Erleada (apalutamide), the drug was so effective that within two weeks of presenting the results, it was FDA-approved. That’s a record. Data was presented showing that 800 patients were benefitting from the drug, and then it was approved.

The only drug that gained approval that quickly in all of oncology was Soltamox (tamoxifen) for breast cancer. We think this is going to happen all the time now.

The SPARTAN Trial focused on patients for whom previously there were no treatments. They saw their PSAs going up, but they were not metastatic. There was really nothing for them to do except wait until we started seeing metastases.

Now, with Erleada (apalutamide) there is a chance that they’re not going to see metastases for years. They’ve got hope. For that first group of men, all of this is possible because they found that clinical trial. Hundreds of men who participated in the SPARTAN trial are going to have a prolonged time without metastases.

Would you encourage newly diagnosed men to seek out clinical trials, even if their cancer is under control?

Dr. Simons: Yes. I encourage every patient to think about joining a clinical trial. It’s not an easy message, but there are many studies showing that you get better nursing just by being on a clinical trial. You just get more attention. You can be there for the cure.

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